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Common Fish for Stocking Your Fish Pond

Common Fish for Stocking Your Fish Pond

Fish ponds do not only provide a wonderful aesthetic value to your land, but also provide a lot of recreational options. However, if you have decided to add a pond to your landscape, or have purchased a home with a pond, it is important to understand there is some maintenance and upkeep that corresponds with owning a pond. One of the most important tasks is ensuring you are properly and thoughtfully stocking your large pond with the right kind of fish. Many people feel that fish are an unwanted guest in a pond. However, it is important to understand that, even if you do not stock your pond with fish, it is likely that fish will find their way there. (I can guarantee you they will get in there) Therefore it is important to properly stock your pond with the right kind of fish to keep the wrong kind of fish population from expanding out of control. If you stock your pond right after digging, you will likely stay on top of the problem. If you have an older pond you may want to kill off everything in it before stocking. Otherwise you will likely waste your money on the fish. Here are some common fish with which to stock your pond: Largemouth Bass – The Largemouth Bass is a predatory fish and a popular choice to help maintain a healthy balance in your pond. They eat fish and crayfish and are an excellent predator fish year round. Not to mention they are a lot of fun to catch. Bluegill – Bluegill are sunfish that can be stocked year round, however, when it gets really hot the fish may not fair well in transit. Bluegill can then usually spawn 3 to 4 times in between spring and fall.  Bluegill tend stick to water of 60-80 °F, about 16-27 °C. Bluegill fry poses as a perfect snack for your Bass so if you have any bass in your pond they will grow rapidly if you have plenty of Bluegill in it. Sterile Grass Carp – Primarily used to control underwater vegetation issues, the Grass Carp is an excellent fish for the right kind of pond. These fish will control underwater vegetation and keep it at bay. It is important to note that if you do not have excessive underwater vegetation, the Grass Carp is not a good stock fish for your pond. It is important that they are sterile because you do not want these fish reproducing in your pond. In many states you will need to obtain a license to stock these fish. Rainbow Trout – Rainbow Trout are seasonal fish in most parts of the world in that they require cold water. Therefore, in many places, the water is too warm for Rainbow Trout during the warm months. However, they are a popular stock fish and often used in the fall and winter seasons for stock. Though it is important to consider your climate and the area in which you live, many of these fish are common throughout the United States and other parts of the world for stocking your garden ponds. Though most fish are purely for a stocking purpose, some claim to have specific benefits to a garden pond. In addition, adding fish attractor spheres, such as the Porcupine Fish Attractor Sphere, to your garden pond will help improve the spawning habitat while increasing the survival rate of your fish.